I’m A Savage, And I’m Proud Of It

I'm a savage
Photo by Brooke Cagle - Unsplash

Every time the hit song, Savage by Meg Thee Stallion comes on, I turn up the volume and dance. 

It has a contagious rhythm impossible to ignore.

I’m a savage (yeah) 

Classy, bougie, ratchet (yeah) 

Sassy, moody, nasty (hey, hey, yeah) 

Meg Thee Stallion shares her personal definition of a savage.

But what is yours?

Do you identify with the word savage, and find belonging in it? Or do you recoil and run away from it?

I believe a savage is a person who has the ambition and strength to be an unapologetic badass. A savage is persistent and super confident, without an enormous ego. She is fierce like fire. Wild and untamed. Nothing and no one can control her. 

Since day one, many people believed that I could not live a normal life.

I never enjoyed being treated like a fragile porcelain doll. I hate being called dependent or challenged.

A flame of determination has always burned inside me. And being told, “you can’t do that,” has only made it burn stronger and brighter.

Some might say I developed my savageness a little too early on in life. I was the blonde cutie in the wheelchair, who always fought for and demanded acceptance and respect. I wanted people to see what I see when I look in the mirror. An ordinary girl with big dreams. 

I never backed down for nothing, even when the odds were against me.

Many professionals expected me to not succeed in Regular Ed classes or even go on to college. They should have known better than to disregard a stubborn little girl like me.

Even though it was physically draining, I always kept up and bust my butt on every assignment. I graduated high school with a great GPA and three scholarships. Five years later, I got a bachelor’s degree with a 3.2 GPA. 

There were many moments I doubted myself and wished my life could be less challenging. But I rolled on and adapted to each situation with the best of my abilities.

I’m currently a freelance creative writer. And my skin was forced to thicken ever since I entered the writing and publishing industry. Many have rejected my work while others have viewed my disability as a limitation.

I’m still not where I expected to be by now in my career, but I am enjoying the ride. I’ve not slowed down in sending out submissions or proposals.  My resume and writing profile has gradually filled up with great credits. I am truly a savage when it comes to getting my voice heard by editors and publishers.  

My personal life was a magnet for the same judgement.

I was never shy to flirt with guys or ask them out. I honestly used to joke about how I was the perfect triple threat because I have the beauty, brains, and the wheels. What guy wouldn’t like that? 

But surviving the dating scene was like surviving an endless hurricane. Most guys couldn’t handle my disability and treated me like a human barbie doll. Something to play with for their enjoyment. They strung me along until I eventually gave up.

I tore myself apart for attention and affection. And I came out with many scars and bruises on my heart. But I ended up finding my soulmate. Just like I knew I would. We met on a dating app five years ago, and are happily married today. We celebrated our second anniversary this year.

You see. my disability has not made me weak.  It has made me strong. It has made me tougher and ready to meet this crazy, unfair world. And it has taught me how to be a beautiful savage. 

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